Career Advice

Leaving The Forces: The Steps Towards The Future

Leaving The Forces

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The military can provide a great career for many people. With it comes the opportunity to receive the highest level of training, travel the world, learn to work as a very tight team, whilst serving your country with pride. 

For many, a career in the military is something that they look to do for a number of years. In addition to the skills that can be gained, military life can offer a chance to save some money up and create some stability for your future. But for many, spending months on overseas tours of duty, being away from loved ones, and the desire to have a family of their own can prompt some military personnel to leave at a convenient contract break. 

The military can provide a great career for many people. With it comes the opportunity to receive the highest level of training, travel the world, learn to work as a very tight team, whilst serving your country with pride.

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For other veterans, the reasons to leave may be based on injuries received while in service preventing them from continuing. Another problem may be relating to psychological trauma as a result of their time in the difficult and tense conflicts.

Making A Career Change After The Military

Moving on from the military can leave a huge gap in the lives of many people. Having spent years in a regimented institution with a very strict routine, to suddenly go from a life that is mapped out for you to nothing, can make veterans feeling rudderless and lacking grounding in their lives. 

To get the best support for transitioning speak with a career advisor, or get in touch with the veteran consulting services who will be able to provide you with a range of support across a number of different areas of your life. From career to counseling, and getting back into the routine of a civilian lifestyle. 

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What Career Options Would Suit

Veterans are very sought after by many recruiters from a number of different business backgrounds. Often, where military personnel has worked in engineering roles, they will have received high levels of training and will have very high working standards that meet rigorous military safety levels. These skills would be advantageous to any engineering business, and as such you could expect to go in at a reasonable career level.

“You should consider your skillset. Start with the basics. Are you an extrovert, or an introvert? This should be something you already know quite well about yourself, so it’s a good place to get going. It’s also important to get this out of the way. An extrovert would thrive in say, a teaching role, while an introvert wouldn’t get along. At the same time, an introvert would operate well in a job such as writing, while an extrovert would hate it! So, do you like being in front of the crowd, or would you rather work in isolation?” – Five Questions You Can’t Change Your Career Without

Many frontline military personnel will be adept at dealing with a range of very difficult situations. They will be able to work under extreme pressure, and may well have excellent communication skills. This makes the emergency services a good place for veterans to seek out future employment. Fire brigades will require active workers who are able to handle situations without fear. The police force will need people who can communicate effectively and handle difficult and sensitive information in a professional manner. If you have medical experience at any level, then working for as an emergency responder or in the emergency room of a hospital may be great uses of the skills that you gained during your time in the forces. 

While it may be daunting leaving military service, there are plenty of opportunities for anyone with the types of skills that can be gained from such a role.

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