Career Advice

Playing to One’s Strengths: 5 Job Suggestions That Are Suitable for Autistic Adults

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There are a lot of tools and resources for helping children with autism navigate school, friendships, and life. However, very little consideration is given to how to help those former children be successful once they are out of school and must navigate adulthood.

Being an adult often requires having a steady job to earn income for living expenses. For neurodiverse adults, finding the right job can seem impossible.

While people with autism CAN and DO work, their employers must be aware of their limitations and be willing to make proper accommodations. Unfortunately, many companies are not always willing to put in the time and effort it may take to help a neurodiverse employee succeed.

Being an adult often requires having a steady job to earn income for living expenses. For neurodiverse adults, finding the right job can seem impossible.

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Potential Careers for People with Autism

Autism is not a one-size-fits-all disorder. There is a broad range of characteristics along the autism spectrum.

Some people with autism may be non-verbal, while others are high-functioning. Visual-thinking versus non-visual thinking is another difference found from one autistic person to the next.

If you think you may have autism, this test can help you determine where on the spectrum you land. It’s not an official diagnosis, but it can act as a precursor to a visit with your doctor to discuss the matter.

However, poor short-term memory is a trait shared by both low and high-functioning autism. Fast-paced jobs with many things to remember, such as waitress, receptionist, and casino dealer, are not suitable for those with short-term memory problems.

Careers that don’t involve a lot of interpersonal skills and other social skills are better for people with autism. Workplace readiness programs can help autistic adults land good jobs. Here are 5 job suggestions for people with autism.

veterinarian

1.Vet Technician

Any type of job with animals is well-suited for a person with autism. First of all, there’s very little interaction with other people. More importantly, animals, especially dogs, can help a person with autism stay focused and calm. Other career ideas involving animals include dog sitter, pet groomer and zookeeper.

“Whether you want to explore new challenges within a career interest or to experience something new and exciting outside of your current career scope, you have options. Finding satisfying work is a rewarding task when understanding personal interests and capabilities within career fields. Whether you want to explore new challenges within a career interest or to experience something new and exciting outside of your current career scope, you have options” – 7 Careers You Can Try Switching over to

2. Computer Programmer

Computer programming is another job that involves little contact with humans. People with autism are often good at math and visualization, both of which are required for computer programming.

3. Research Assistant

Research assistance is needed in several different fields, such as science, book publishing, and libraries. People with autism generally have an unparalleled ability to recognize the minutiae and an impeccable long-term memory.

4. Assembly Line

Assembly line work is very orderly and repetitive. People with autism are prone to developing strict routines that thrive on order. Other manufacturing jobs involve rebuilding products from scratch, which is another thing people on the autism spectrum may enjoy.

5. Copy Editor

A copy-editing job entails correcting mistakes found in articles or other written formats. The work requires excellent attention to detail that people with autism often possess. Copy-editing does require a significant amount of human interaction, so it may be better suited to those with high-functioning autism.

More Opportunities For People with Autism Than Ever Before

In the last ten-to-fifteen years, the public’s awareness and understanding of Autism Spectrum Disorder have greatly improved. The television network ABC has a show, The Good Doctor, where the lead character is a brilliant surgeon who happens to be on the autism spectrum.

Finding an employer open to accommodating someone with autism is, of course, more difficult than it appears on a fictional television show.

However, finding a job as a person with autism can be easier if they know what fields to look in and which careers, such as ones that require good short-term memory, to avoid.

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