Using Your Knowledge of Law to Benefit a Second Career

pyschMany people don’t realize the value of how knowledge obtained in one career can benefit another career. Even if one of those jobs is only part-time work, both careers can impact each other in profound ways. For instance, Joseph Tacopina works as a sports agent as well as a high-profile defense attorney. His skills of negotiation benefit both aspects of his life while providing a platform to possibly represent clients in cases. This isn’t saying that all lawyers can have the same experience, but it goes to show how two unlikely scenarios can benefit one another.

Skills and Abilities

Knowing specific laws can be beneficial to other careers depending on the practice. For instance, real estate law could be beneficial for those that operate real estate businesses. However, it could also help other paths such as business acquisitions through development of negotiation tactics. A criminal defense attorney could have insight when it comes to owning and operating convenience stores and retail shops by using clients as examples of defending the establishment from the criminal element. The skills, abilities and knowledge through practicing law could be beneficial across many different secondary career paths. It all depends on how you perceive your capabilities and how they could be put to other uses.

Protecting One Career with Another

As an attorney, you could provide a layer of protection for virtually any business depending on your legal focus. If you’re practicing real estate law, developing land contracts and other documentation for your own real estate business could be greatly beneficial. It can offer a way to keep your assets covered in the event of criminal fraud and other possible complications. In the case of Joe Tacopina, any of his sports clients that are accused of criminal actions could use him as an attorney as well as an agent. This is extremely beneficial to his clients for it gives them access to an attorney that may already know the individual’s mannerisms. It offers a comfortable atmosphere as the client is familiar with the agent.

Conflict of Interest

Depending on the type of law you practice and the path of the secondary career, there may be times when a conflict of interest could arise. While these may be rare, you need to be prepared in such an event. For example: What if you’re a criminal defense attorney that doubles as a sports agent who owns a nightclub? It’s a little convoluted, but it’s a possibility. What if your client robs your nightclub? Do you defend the client that constantly sends a percentage of his or her contract to your bank account, or do you work to protect your establishment possibly resulting in cutting the residual income from the client? Most of you may reserve answering until more facts surrounding the circumstances could be revealed.

Acquiring Transferable Capabilities

If you sit down and develop a list of skills you currently use in your career, realize that these abilities are easily transferable to alternatives of work. As a legal representative, you could amass an incredible number of abilities for future careers especially those dealing directly with the public.

You don’t have to lock yourself into a single career and still be happy with your chosen way of life. Many attorneys hold down secondary jobs in order to feel more fulfilled. For a lot of these people, it’s not about the money – but more about helping others. Perhaps you could use your legal prowess to add another career to your resume.

We are always eager to hear from our readers. Please feel free to contact us if you have any questions or suggestions regarding CareerAlley content.

Good luck in your search,
Joey

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Time to Move on? Jump Start your Job Search

SharkA short story to start my slightly longer post. Please stay with me, there is a point to this . . .

You are swimming in the ocean. It’s a beautiful day, the water is calm and you can see palm trees on the beach. Serenity – all is well, not a care in the world. All of a sudden, a large school of small fish swims past you, apparently in a hurry. That’s strange, you think. You wonder why they are in such a hurry? You look out over the horizon and you think you see a large shadow in the water about 100 feet out. Must be a cloud partially covering the sun. You are so relaxed, the ocean is wonderful. You look out over the horizon and now you see what must be a shark’s fin cutting through the water. How could you have been so foolish? All the signs were there – fish swimming away, a shadow in the water, and you ignored the signs. Now what? Should you stay very still in the hope that the shark will not see you or should you make a break for the shore? You decide to make a break for the shore, not knowing if the shark will spot you or if you will make it in one piece. You are committed and the race is on . . .

Okay, maybe a little melodramatic, but we’ve all been there (and I’m not talking about the ocean). You are feeling secure in your job, not a worry in the world when all of a sudden the signs you’ve ignored over the last few months come together for you and you realize that your job is at risk. Do you stay very still or do you break for the shore?

Times are not what they were 20 years ago when there was relative job safety the longer you stayed in your job. Mergers, bankruptcies, a change in management, a brutal recession. It doesn’t really matter why. The water is not always as safe as it seems.

Don’t dwell on the things you can’t change, focus on what you can change – getting a new job. You can fast track your job search in a number of ways. While this does not necessarily mean that you will find a job before the shark catches up, being proactive and getting yourself in motion will increase the likelihood that you will find a job sooner rather than later.

You should take a quick look at a related post – “I lost my job, now what?“. We are going to start with #2 on the list of “what to do first” (hopefully you wont need number 1).

Book CornerJob!: Learn How to Find Your Next Job In 1 Day

We are always eager to hear from our readers. Please feel free to contact us if you have any questions or suggestions regarding CareerAlley content.

Good luck in your search (and watch out for those sharks!).
Joey

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Job Search – There Must be an App for That – Part 1 of 5

by Jason HowieWe live in an “always online” world these days. Whether we are responding to emails at our desk, checking updates on Facebook, texting our friends, looking up just about everything on Google, it is never-ending. And when we can’t connect, like the 5 minutes our train goes through the tunnel or the 30 seconds we spend in an elevator, we get very agitated. There is this need to “communicate now”, although my favorite is watching people attempting to walk and text at the same time (and if you have any doubts, check out the amazing number of “texting while walking” videos on Youtube). Well job search is no different. No, not searching while walking (although I’m sure it’s been done), but being able to job hunt and manage your career from (almost) anywhere.

There are a several categories to consider:

  1. File management and storage and other utilities
  2. Job search (finding jobs that match your criteria)
  3. “Help” apps (like resume writing tools)
  4. Communications (emailing your resume, video chatting, etc.)
  5. Social networks (like LinkedIn)

There are probably hundreds of apps across the 5 categories listed above. Certainly too many for one article (hence the 5 part series).

Today’s post will cover 5 job search apps (obviously the tip of the iceberg).

File Management & Storage – So (my) quick definition of this category is any application that runs on a smartphone (iOS, Android or other) that allows the user to manage storage (in the cloud) of files, allows manipulation of files or allows the user to email the files . Unfortunately, there is no one app that will do everything (although some are close). Also, not every app is on every smartphone platform, but many are on both iOS and Android.

  • Google Docs – Okay, so this is not actually an app, but you can access all of your Google Docs files via the browser on your smartphone. There are Google Docs applications from third party developers that will allow you to (somewhat) manage and change your Google Docs files. Not ideal, but a no cost alternative. Google has developed “Google Drive”, which allows you to share your Google Docs items with your cloud drive, however, no Google Drive app was available at the time of this writing.
  • Dropbox – My favorite tool. You can store up to 2GB free and have your files available via an iPhone/iPad app or a PC or Mac desktop version. The mobile version allows the user to email their doc, or edit with a variety of tools (Pages, GoDocs, Quickoffice, Evernote and more). Anything updated, uploaded or changed on any device is synced and available on other devices. The only thing missing is a built-in editor.
  • Box.com (aka Box.net) – The smartphone app is very similar to Dropbox, different interface. Basically, cloud storage but you need to leverage other tools (like Dropbox) to edit your document.
  • Evernote – Access your files, email your files and change your files with the free version. You can’t, however, access your file offline with the free version. The paid version gives you offline access as well.
  • Documents to go – Pretty much do it all. Access Word, Excel, PowerPoint and PDF files saved directly on your smartphone, access files saved saved on Google docs, email files, edit files and create files. Pretty much your own local office with all of the flexibility of email and editing.

Book Corner: Get the Job: Optimize Your Resume for the Online Job Search

We are always eager to hear from our readers. Please feel free to contact us if you have any questions or suggestions regarding CareerAlley content.

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Joey

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6 Tools to Help Launch Your Job Search

33-1239554996g5JoThere are eight or so key items you need to launch a successful job search (see Why You Need a Job Search Marketing Toolkit). This includes a few key documents you will need to draft (such as your resume, cover letters and thank you letters). If you’ve drafted a resume, you know how difficult this can be (and if you haven’t, you know it will be challenging). Other key items you will need are your network, references and target markets/companies. Even if you have a version of your resume, it is probably wise to take another look and update it as necessary (another great resource is 5 Steps to a Great Resume).

The good news is that you don’t need to go it alone. There are tools you can use that will help you create most (if not all) of you documents and lists. The sites listed below are purely very high level reviews, CareerAlley does not endorse or get paid for listing any of the sites reviewed below.

Resume Writing Tools: There are lots of resume writing tools out there, some are free and some are not.  Is a “fee based” resume writing tool better? Not necessarily.  Following are three tools for your review.

  • FormSwift for Resumes – FormSwift’s Resume Builder is also great for any job seeker. Our builder takes you section by section, line by line, so all you have to do is input your experiences. Once you are done filling out your personal info, the builder formats your resume for you, taking the stress out of worrying if your header is too large or your typeface too small. Once again, this builder is completely free – allowing you to experiment with different word choice for different job applications.
  • ResumeGenius – Sample phrases, templates and guides are the main selling points of ResumeGenius. This is not a free site, so you will want to look at the various costs (at the end of this paragraph) before you complete your template. You also do not have to register if you do not want to. Start off quickly by clicking the “Write my resume now” button, next pick your template (if in doubt, select Classic for now). Next you will start to fill in the main sections of your resume (tabs for Contact Info, Work Experience, Eduction and Additional Skills. You can preview your resume as you go, add sections (I would like to point out is that “Career Objective” is generally not used anymore although it is offered as a section), save at any time as well as select the option for a professional to help write your resume (at a cost). One thing to note is that it will cost you $1.95 to download your resume and have 14 days of full access, after which you will be automatically charged $39.95 per month (unless you select the Monthly Access option for $7.95).  Whether or not the cost is worth it is a personal decision.  You could opt for the $1.95 14 day trial and cancel after that (or use one of the free services).
  • How to Write a Resume – This site offers both a step by step resume builder as well as a cover letter tool. Start by clicking the “Start Now” and then either create a free account or log on via a variety of sites (like Facebook, Google, etc.). Once you log on, click Resume Builder and start to build your resume. There are categories on the left hand side of the screen for the different sections of your resume. Some sections allow you to use a template or you can enter the information as you see fit. There are some aspects of the site that are not free (like including references). You will also need to pay extra to get your resume or cover letter in Word or PDF format (the free option in text or html format).  If you click the “click here for the full feature list”, you can see the free features versus the features that will cost extra. It looks like these are one-time fees (rather than the monthly fees that ResumeGenius charges). There is also a cover letter builder that works in a similar fashion.

 

Cover Letter Tools:

  • FormSwift for Cover Letters – FormSwift’s Cover Letter Builder is great for any job seeker. The formatting is all pre-organized and you can change the letter copy by choosing which career stage process you are at – college student, new job seeker, returning professional, etc. Then all you have to do is input a few key words and phrases for each paragraph that personalize your story and, voila, your cover letter is all done! Last but not least, our builder is completely free, so you can make as many copies and edits as you would like, which is perfect for someone running on a tight budget while applying for jobs.
  • SmartCoverLetter – Before you get started, read “What Makes a Good Cover Letter?” included on their home page. Also, this is not a free site and you will want to look at the costs before you take the time to complete the template. This overview provides some great insight into why a cover letter (not just any cover letter, but a good one) is so important. Start by clicking the “Create Letter” button, fill in your contact info and get started. Next you will see the body of (an incomplete) cover letter. You can click to fill in each section or change the template by selecting “Select Design” from the top of the page. Exporting will cost you $4.95 for 7 days and then $39.95 per month.
  • The Pain-Free Cover Letter Builder -This is not so much a site as it is a free guide. The guide is very good and not too long (and it is actually free).  While not a tool to guide you through the process, the guide is worth a read.

 

Book Corner:

 

We are always eager to hear from our readers. Please feel free to contact us if you have any questions or suggestions regarding CareerAlley content.

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Joey

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5 Hot Careers in Financial Services

jobs on fireThe dark days of the 2008 financial crisis are far behind us and, while I doubt that working  in Financial Services will ever be as lucrative as it was prior to 2008, it is certainly one of the higher paying industries. The last few years has seen renewed hiring and there are plenty of opportunities if you know where to look. If you are already working in financial services, thinking about moving into financial services or considering career opportunities, there are some hot careers that you should consider.

Compliance –

  • What They Do –Compliance Officers oversee the Corporate Compliance Program, functioning as an independent and objective body that reviews and evaluates compliance issues/concerns within the organization.  Many of these are driven by regulatory requirements while others are considered “best practice”. They develop, initiate and maintain policies and procedures for organization and its related activities to prevent illegal, unethical, or improper conduct.
  • How Much They Make – This, of course, depends on their background and experience. Many compliance officers are trained lawyers and, as such, will command higher compensations. Others who are career compliance may not make as much, but that varies as well. According to USnews.com, the median salary is approximately $60,740.  Salary survey here ==>> Compliance Officer
  • Education and Training Requirements – Most compliance officers have college degrees and, as indicated above, many of them are trained lawyers. Much, of course, depends on the role. You can find some of the requirements at the following link ==>>How to Become a Compliance Officer

 

Risk Officer –

  • What They Do –Risk officers are responsible for the governance and management necessary to identify, evaluate, mitigate, and monitor the company’s financial risk. Develops &/or utilizes financial risk management tools and practices to analyze and report on financial market risks. Monitors the organization’s financial risk management policies, limits to ensure that they are in compliance with applicable regulations and industry standards.
  • How Much They Make – Compensation has a broad range, depending on the position responsibilities and level. The lower end is approximately $60,000 while management levels are in the mid to high $100,000 range. Salary survey here ==>>Risk Management Salaries
  • Education and Training Requirements – As with most of these positions, a college degree is a must have (difficult without one). You can find some of the requirements at the following link ==>>Financial Risk Manager

 

Asset Managers

  • What They Do –Asset managers offer financial advice to individuals, organizations and corporations. While they generally work within a team that includes tax and estate planning professionals, they may also recommend investment portfolio solutions.
  • How Much They Make – According to glassdoor.com, the median salary is $75,000 and can go well above $100,000. Salary survey here ==>> Asset Manager Salaries
  • Education and Training Requirements – Generally speaking, you don’t start your career as an asset manager. You typically work your way up through an organization, providing support to asset management professionals with the goal of becoming one yourself. You can find some of the requirements at the following link ==>>How to Become an Asset Manager

 

Investment Banking Analyst  –

  • What They Do –Analysts are typically hired directly out of college and start their career in a training program.  Analysts are the lowest level in investment banking and generally do the bulk of the work.  They prepare presentations, complex analysis, industry/company research and perform administrative tasks.
  • Education and Training Requirements – Doubtful you will get into this line of work without a college degree. The better the school (and your grades), the better your chances. You can find some of the requirements at the following link ==>>How To Become An Investment Bank Analyst

 

Financial Auditor –

  • What They Do –Financial auditors plan audits to assess internal control effectiveness, review compliance with applicable regulations, ensure standard accounting practices and corporate accounting policies are followed and provide recommendations that create greater efficiencies / controls in terms of operations and financial reporting.
  • How Much They Make – According to recruiter.com, auditors generally earn between $48,000 and $72,000 depending on experience and industry.  Salary survey here ==>> Salary for Auditors
  • Education and Training Requirements – You can find some of the requirements at the following link ==>>

We are always eager to hear from our readers. Please feel free to contact us if you have any questions or suggestions regarding CareerAlley content.

Good luck in your search,
Joey

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