5 Reasons Why You Won’t Get a Job Offer

wrong screwA tremendous amount of time and effort goes into preparing and succeeding in getting a new job. Updating resumes, leveraging your networks, going on interviews, etc. Many people face rejection during the job search process and most have no idea why they did not succeed in getting the job. Sometimes it’s obvious (not qualified, your compensation is too high, etc.) but many times it is not. While recruiters might give you some feedback (they might not tell you the full story), hiring managers will not provide feedback as to why they have rejected you for the position.

If you’re been rejected when you thought you were sure to get an offer, then you need to figure out went wrong and adjust your approach to be more effective and eliminate reasons why you have not been successful.

Following are 5 reasons why you won’t get a job offer:

1. You Are Not Prepared

Reading the job description does not qualify as preparing for a job interview. You need to do your research on the company, the interviewers and the position. You should also be familiar with common interview questions and ensure you have the right answers.  Use your social networks to find people you know who work at the company and get as much background information as possible. Leverage LinkedIn to review the profiles of the interviewer(s).  Last, but not least make sure you have your sales pitch / 30 minute elevator speech (Do you have your 30 second Elevator Speech?)

 

2. Square Peg, Round Hole:

Your resume looks like a good match to the job description. You get called for the interview but in your heart you know that you are not really qualified for the job.  You decide to go on the interview anyway. We all have our doubts from time to time, sometimes it is because we are taking that leap to the next level in our career. But sometimes it is real, and only you know if are not really qualified. Not having the required qualifications is one more reason you might not be getting the job offer. Candidates often lack the necessary skills and experience required for the job. They either overstate their qualifications or they apply for jobs that simply do not match their experience and skills. See 9 Reasons Why I Won’t Hire You

 

3. You Ask the Wrong Questions:

Another major reason for not getting a job offer is you ask the wrong questions. Don’t ask about overtime and vacation too early in the process, there will be plenty of time for this in later interview stages or even once you get an offer.  Not asking questions will make the hiring manager think that you are not excited about the position or that you don’t really want the job. Show excitement and confidence during the interview to increase your chances of getting an offer.

 

4. You Were More Interested in “What’s in it for me?”:

Second only to being “the right person for the job” is showing enthusiasm for the company and the role. You need to convince the hiring manager that you really want to work for the company (and you should have a good list of why that is).  If you are more interested in what the job has to offer you rather than what you have to offer, you likely to be rejected. Although you might be eager to know what benefits the job has to offer, the interviewer first wants to know what you can do for the company. Establish your importance by letting the interviewer know how you can benefit them by your skills and expertise and why you are the best fit for the company and the job.

 

5. Poor Communications Skills:

Interviews are short in nature and you will have a limited time to communicate much to the hiring manager (why you are the best person for the job, why you will be a great fit for the company, your relevant experience, etc.).  If you can’t get your point across somewhat quickly, you will most likely not be getting a job offer. Besides having the required experience and qualifications, interviewers look for a confident personality with strong communications skills. Practice makes perfect and you should find friends or relatives who will practice mock interviews with you.

 

Book CornerHow To Interview Like A Pro: Forty-Three Rules For Getting Your Next Job

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Joey

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5 Job Interview Tips for Success

Businessman Midair in a Business MeetingThere is nothing more exhausting and challenging than the process of trying to find a job.  It is time consuming and sometimes overwhelming.  Lots of ups and downs. Leads, the hope of an interview and finally the ever challenging interview process. Interviews are, without a doubt, the hardest and most stressful part of any job search. We so often forget to put in the time and effort to properly prepare for our interview. Your interview is like the “final exam”, fail this and you will fail your job search.

As difficult and anxiety-inducing as interviews can be, however, making a good impression at an interview is a skill that can be developed, practiced and honed to a point where you have the confidence to not only have a great interview, but get the job offer as well.

There are some focus items that will help you ace your interview.

1. Practice Makes Perfect:

Instead of trembling in your house, waiting for the big interview, take every opportunity to interview that you can. Practice with friends and relatives. Interview for jobs even if it’s for a job that you don’t necessarily want, nothing will give you interview experience like an actual interview. Interview practice is one of the keys to success. See if a recruiter will do a mock interview with you. You need to know how the process works, and you need to figure out what you do well and what needs some work.

 

2. Focus on Relevant Experience:

Let’s face it, the interviewer is only interested in one thing – can you do the job.  Focus on relevant experience based on the job description. Also discuss any pertinent projects or key achievements that seem relevant to the job description, information the interviewer has given you or questions the interviewer has asked. The thing to remember is that no one has your specific experience, the interviewer is not a mind reader and no one can tell your story except for you. Before you go into your next interview, plot out the major points of you know you will want to discuss, this includes meaningful experiences that have shaped you, your values and your work ethic. People like stories and interviewers are no exceptions.

 

3. Know Your Target Company:

Nothing is worse than not knowing as much information as possible about the company where you are interviewing. Do as much research as possible and then work on adapting that your “pitch” to fit the particular workplace philosophy of the job and company where you are interviewing. Also find out as much as possible about your interviewer(s).  LinkedIn is a good place to start. If the interview is as a result of a recruiter, see how much information they can give you about the company and the individuals you will meet. If you can’t find specific information on the Internet, see which of you network connections can help. The more you know about who is interviewing you, the better your chances of succeeding.

 

4. What You Don’t Know Will Hurt You:

Relevant questions are key (more on that in #5 below), but also very important to you decision process is understanding why the position is open. Some key questions are:

    • Is it a new role?
    • If a new role, why was it created, who does it report to and who had these responsibilities previously?
    • Did the prior person quit (or get fired)?
    • Does the role manage any individuals (and are any of them problematic)?

 

5. So Many Questions, So Little Time:

The theory is that, as the interviewee, you should try and control the pace and direction of the interview. In reality, that does not always work and, if it does, the interviewer is probably not going to be happy.  Make sure you have an extensive list of relevant questions. The reason I say “extensive” is that many questions on your list might be answered by the interviewer(s) before you get a chance to ask them. Saying “You’ve answered all of my questions” before you’ve had a chance to ask one is not a winning strategy. Some of your questions should demonstrate that you’ve done your research on the company and the role.

Other Resources:

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Joey

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5 Resources to Finding a Recruiter and Landing a Job

JobA former coworker called me a few months ago (having tracked me down after 20+ years) and wanted to meet for lunch to catchup. Her career over the last 20 years had started out quite good, but had been on a bit of a plateau for the last 10 years or so. Most recently, she found out that her current job would end in the very near future as she had successfully eliminated her own job (by outsourcing her function – not the smartest move). So part of our conversation was what she was doing to find a new job. The answer, amazingly, was NOTHING! “How can that possibly be?” I asked, you should be spending all of your free time looking for a job. Her view was that she did not think it would take her a long time to find a job, so why should she do any work now? Of course my immediate thought was that she was underestimating the enormity of looking and finding a job. She had, in effect, made a molehill out of a mountain. Today’s post is about finding recruiters.

  • Directories of Recruiters – Best to start out with the mother of all recruiters list from the Riley Guide. One of the best job search resources on the Internet, the Riley Guide directories of recruiters is like a list of lists. The main page starts off with a bunch of free directories to help you find a recruiter. This is followed by a list of fee-based directories (but first exhaust the free directories).
  • TheRecruiterNetwork – This website provides a listing of recruiters and allows posting your profile so that they can find you. The right hand side of the page has a list of featured recruiters. Click on Job Seekers from the top of the page to link to the sign-on page. Create a free profile which will be used as a way for these firms to find you. Use the featured recruiter list to look at individual recruiters.
  • Headhuntersdirectory – This site provides an online list of headhunters and recruiters that is free to use. The main page leads with an overview of the site and a regional selection page. Select your region to continue. For the US link, the next page lists all of the states down the left hand side of the page and a graphical map view where you can select your state. Clicking your state leads to a city listing to further refine your search. Clicking on a city leads to a list of recruiters where you can click on their website link to find out more about the firms, how to apply for jobs and additional resources.
  • Findarecruiter – The title is self-explanatory and their tag line “Find Recruiters • Headhunters • Executive Search Consultants • Employment Agencies • Staffing Firms • Search Professionals” supports the name of the site. The main page has featured recruiters on the left (click on any of these to be taken to their website). The right hand side of the page has a search engine where you enter your criteria to find a recruiting professional. Once the engine returns a list, you can view the available jobs for those recruiters. The left hand side of the page now displays Partner Recruiters (where you can also click to link).

Book Corner: How to Work With Recruiters Effectively: Get Headhunters to Market You

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Joey

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10 Links to Finding Your Job Search Recruiter

I don’t know if this happens to you, but sometimes I get calls from recruiters asking if I know someone with specific job experience. Of course the experience they just described sounds like a summary of my resume.  So immediately I think “wait a minute, I know that person and that person is me”. Now I’m not a great believer in coincidences, and I’m not really as dumb as I look, so this recruiter is obviously fishing for ME. Now sometimes I just can’t help myself (actually, I usually can’t help myself), so of course I say to the recruiter “well maybe I would be interested in that position”. One thing leads to another and off we go. So, what is the point of this sad but true story? Recruiters are another great resource for your job search and while you just might get lucky and they find you, I would not place any hopes on that happening (even if it does happen to me every so often). Let’s take a look at the long list of Recruiters, Headhunters and the like.

Where to Find Recruiters:

  • How to Find a Recruiter – How do you go about finding a recruiter that will fit your needs? This site (SearchFirm.com) is one place you can start your look. On the main page, click “find” and the recruiter search screen comes up. You can put in any criteria (all or none) and the search engine will return a list of recruiters that match your request. The criteria includes: Specialty, firm type, where, name contains and more. This is a great site to add to your list, but remember, don’t spend more than 20% – 25% of your time on recruiter.
  • Online Recruiters Directory – This is a really neat site, offered by Online Recruiters Directory. There are a number of approaches you can take. Click Job Seeker from the tab at the top of the page, this will take you directly to the recruiters search box. Three steps – select your category (industry), job type (temp, perm, etc.) and state. Click “search recruiters” and you have your list with all of the contact information you need. You can also click the links on the right hand side of the page under “I am a Job Seeker”.
  • Find a Recruiter – This site provides another search engine for you. You can select from the featured recruiters on the left-center side of the page or the search box from the right hand side. Simply select you field of interest followed by the region and then click “go find a recruiter”. This will return a list of recruiters. Click on any recruiter for the contact information.
  • Recommended Recruiters – Another great site. The main page has a search box where you can enter keywords or location. You can also click the browse or advanced search at the bottom of the page. Clicking the browse button provides a page that allows you to browse by state, discipline and industry.

A Few Recruiters:

  • A-List Associates – This recruiting firm specializes in Executive Assistants and Administrative Support and are a New York City based firm. Their main page has tabs at the top for About Us, Why A-List?, Services, Positions and Contact Us. Click on the Positions link to view the open positions. Each position has a brief overview and you can apply fr the job directly from this page. If you don’t see a position that suits you, go to the Contact Us link and click. The Contact Us page has several contact options: phone, fax, snail mail and an online contact file (where you can attach your resume for upload).
  • Harris Rand – This is a retained executive search firm that specializes in public service organizations across the US. The main page has a comprehensive overview of the company with links on the left hand side of the page for Biographies, Client List (a good source of leads), Current Searches, Search Process and Associated Resources. Click on Current Searches to see current job opportunities. Click on any job to see the details. You can apply directly online. Contact info for the firm is located at the bottom of the Current Searches page.
  • Sinon Group – This search firm has two locations, one in NY and one in Connecticut. Their main page has a high level over view with office contact information. The left hand side of the page has links for About Us, Partners, Contact Us and Current Jobs. Click Current Jobs for a list of all open positions. You can click “detail” to see additional information on any job and you can apply from within the job description or from the summary jobs page. Click on Partners to contact the partners directly (bios and contact information is provided on this page).
  • Top Tier Financial – Specializing in Finance and Construction (according the their website), the main page has a company overview with tabs at the top for Candidates, Our People and Contact. The right hand side of the page has a link for the Construction part of the firm (which has similar links). No jobs are listed on the site, but click Contact for snail mail, phone, fax and email address.
    Roberts & Ryan – A simple home page, this firm recruits for a number of industries. There is a brief overview, followed by a few tabs – Who We are, Our Experience, Candidates and Contact Us. Click Candidates and then Learn More and Submit to email your resume. Click Contact Us for telephone, fax and snail mail information.

Two More Lists:

  • CareerAlley’s List of Recruiters – My (almost) comprehensive list of recruiters covered on CareerAlley. Click any of the recruiter names to link directly to their website.

Book CornerThe Job Search Solution: The Ultimate System for Finding a Great Job Now!

We are always eager to hear from our readers. Please feel free to contact us if you have any questions or suggestions regarding CareerAlley content.

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Joey

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14 Job Search Resources for 2015

Career_Coach_Picture_Ivy_ExecThere are four basic categories of job search resources – Recruiters, Job Search Sites, Social Networks and Company Career Sites. You should have your short list (you need to keep your list narrow and focused at the start) of sites that you will focus on. You should be allocating your the time you spend on job search across these resource types. But rather than just finding whatever comes up when you do an Internet search, you will have a more efficient search if you focus on a few select resources (you can expand your list as you go). The best way to focus is to select search resource types that match you industry (such as recruiters who specialize in your field).  To help with this process, we’ve collected a list of lists for each of the job search resource types mentioned above.

Recruiters: Most recruiters are regionally based, although some are nationwide or global. Many others will help recruit in any region if their client requests it. The following recruiter lists will help you create your list. Recruiters are the one exception to “less is more”. The more recruiters you leverage, the better your chances of landing a job (just don’t tell them that you are registered with 100 search firms!).

  • Recruiters & Headhunters (by CareerAlley) – First and foremost is CareerAlley’s list of recruiters. This is an alphabetical list of recruiters with links to their homepage.
  • Online Recruiters Directory – This is a really neat site, offered by Online Recruiters Directory. There are a number of approaches you can take. Click Job Seeker from the tab at the top of the page, this will take you directly to the recruiters search box. Three steps – select your category (industry), job type (temp, perm, etc.) and state. Click “search recruiters” and you have your list with all of the contact information you need. You can also click the links on the right hand side of the page under “I am a Job Seeker”.
  • The Riley Guide: Sites with Job Listings – For those who are not familiar with the Riley Guide, it is one of the best online resources for  job search. Take a look at their alphabetical listing of recruiters and staffing firms.

 

Job Search Sites: There are hundreds of job search sites on the Internet. This is definitely a case of where less is more. Limit yourself to 3 or so job search sites (more than that is not a good use of your time) and take a look at those that best fit your needs. Use at least one “generic” site and then pick two that are focused on your industry or career.

  • 27 Job Search Boards and Thousands of Jobs – This is a list of job search sites from CareerAlley with a brief description for each site. Take a look at these and start to build your list of job search sites.
  • Over 100 iPhone job apps – You need to be nimble and leverage your smartphone in your job search as well. This is a great source of iPhone job apps (from JobMob.co.il) to help you find a job on the run. Using Android and feeling left out? Don’t worry, they also have a great list for Android – 300+ Android Job Search Apps.

 

Social Networks / Industry Trade Groups: Social networks (and your network in particular) should be a key part of your job search (the old saying that 80% of all job openings are not advertised). You should already have your network, following are a few resources to help you build and maintain it.

 

Company Career Sites: Company career sites are a great source of job openings (might as well go right to the source). You need to do your research and create your list of companies where you would like to work.  The links below will help you find the company links more quickly.

  • Sites with Job Listings (from the Riley Guide) – Another great list of resources from the Riley Guide. You name it, they’ve got it. From part-time to full time to self-employed.

 

Other Resources:

  • The Top Job Search Articles of 2014 – Over 50 of the most viewed job search articles for 2014 from a wide variety of sites. Get great information on interviews, LinkedIn, what not to do in job search, cover letters, internships, top companies for remote jobs, and the list goes on.
  • JobDescriptions.net – This is a nifty career information source. At the top of the page are tabs for Health, Business, Education, Legal and more. Click on any of those links to see a dedicated page of job descriptions for jobs in that industry. Click on any job description to see a detailed job description followed by training & education requirements, salary & wages and certifications (plus more). Check out the blog as well.
  • CareerOverview.com – This is a career and job search resources site. There are tabs at the top for Explore Careers, Job Search, Career Change, Salary Info and more. Directly below the tabs you can search for degrees, courses and career opportunities. Popular careers are on the left hand side of the page (click any of these for a drill down to additional detail). Top training schools are listed on the right hand side of the page and further down on the left hand side is a wealth of information on career development, job search and a career change center. Definitely worth a look.
  • Robert Half – Robert Half is a well known finance and accounting recruiting firm. First stop should be their 2015 Salary Guide. There are tabs at the top of the page for Services and Research. The right hand side of the page has a search box where you can search for jobs. Select a country and a specialization and you are on your way. Once you get to the detailed page, put in your key word and your location and off you go. There are tons of job opportunities listed on their site. You can also subscribe to a specific search.

We are always eager to hear from our readers. Please feel free to contact us if you have any questions or suggestions regarding CareerAlley content.

Good luck in your search,
Joey

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