Thousands of Jobs if You Know Where to Look

Depositphotos_3388278_xsAlthough the unemployment rate has improved over the last few years, there still appears to be a shortage of jobs for those who want to work (or get a new job).  I say “appears” because there are jobs out there (if you know where to look and have the right skills). One issue is “job mismatch” right jobs, wrong skills. Another issue is not knowing where (or how) to find jobs that might match your skills.

For the unemployed, the underemployed and the “not yet employed” (like future high school and college grads) there are several options. Reassess your skills and focus on jobs that are a match – there are job opportunities if you know how to match your skills to opportunities. Another option is to change your skill-set (training, additional schooling, etc.), focusing on where the economy is going rather than where it has been.

With that in mind, there are still thousands of jobs out there to be had in both traditional industries and new industries. In fact, there are probably 10’s of thousands of jobs to be had. Now there may not be thousands of jobs that fit your skills and the jobs may not all be located where you live, but if you are willing to have an open mind and are flexible about where you live (or desperate in the extreme), there are many opportunities and I’m about to show you how to find them.

Go Directly to the Source: Companies spend an incredible amount of money hiring staff. From leveraging recruiters (very expensive) to job search boards like SimplyHired or Indeed.com. “Internal sourcing” (see below), is less expensive and (if used correctly) more efficient than external recruiting. For job seekers, it’s a way to have your resume seen first.

  • Company Career Sites: Most of these companies have their own career sites where they list open positions and also accept resumes for general recruiting. It costs companies significantly less to hire individuals who are sourced from their career site. Resumes that are submitted directly to company career sites will have a slightly higher priority than those submitted via job search boards. Senior level roles are more likely to be filled via recruiters (for a variety of reasons).
    • Where to look – Take a look at CareerAlley’s listing of Company Career Sites. If you don’t find the company you are looking for on this page, go to their home page and look for their company career site.
  • Employee Referrals: Another good way to leverage both your network
    and company career sites is to have someone you know who works at the company submit your resume directly for the job opportunity. Employers highly value internal recommendations.
  • Your Network: A slight variation on the item above is to have your network help find a job opportunity for you within their company (rather than you finding one and then they submit your resume). Many times jobs are created and not advertised for a period of time. See –
    5 Tips for Creating a Professional LinkedIn Profile.

 

Use Recruiters: Recruiters have direct access to hiring managers (and sometimes have an exclusive on some positions). Find the recruiters that cover your industry or functional role for the best results.

 

Use a Job Search Boards: There are probably hundreds of job search boards, but you should only focus on 1-3 sites that best serve your needs. Try to use one or two generic major sites (like Indeed.com) plus at least one site that focuses on your industry. Take a look at CareerAlley’s Job Search Boards list.

How to get a job – The theme of this story is very similar to what I’ve said in my opening paragraph – yes, the current unemployment rate has  improved, but there are lots of jobs out there.  The article is worth a read for several reasons, not the least of which there are plenty of good tips.

      • Successful Job Searching – This article, by About.com, provides a step-by-step guide to finding a job. Categories include Write a Resume, Complete a Job Application, Find Job Listings plus a long list of other resources. The right side of this article has a link to several videos – “10 thinks to do after a layoff” and “How to prepare for a job interview”.
      • How to find a job during a recession – CNN weighs in with an article on how to find a job. Another step-by-step article with topics such as trying freelance work, freshen your skills, networking, polish your brand (like my “market yourself”). The middle of the article has additional links to job related articles.
      • HOW TO FIND A JOB? – Not sure why there is a question mark at the end of this page’s name, but don’t be fooled by the first page. There are a number of links on this site to resources such as job search, job applications, resumes, cover letters and more. Each link leads to a robust page with information on the topic. At the bottom of the page are several other links to Work Menu (several resources here), Training, Where (like, where to find a job) and Who can help (many more resources).

And Now the Job Listings and Resources:

      • The 100 Best Jobs – This is a great link, as it shows the highest ranked jobs search sites (as per Google) based on page rank, a few of which are included below. You will note that it is a fairly long list (and you will want to start at the top). The other great thing about this link is that it also provides links to Executive Search, Entry Level and Internships, Job Fairs and more. Now, you should note that, just because a site has a high Google ranking does not necessarily mean it is the best site. So what are some of the best sites, see below for a few.
      • Indeed.com – This is one of the best sites at the moment and, according to their site, thousands of jobs were added in the last 7 days (and that is not a typo) – thousands of jobs, just as I promised. The first page is a very simple interface, two choices What and Where. You can also click on the Advanced Search which provides a broad range of search options. There are additional links at the bottom for Job Trends, Salaries and Forums. And , you don’t have to post your resume on this site.
      • Recruiters Online – “Your key to the hidden job market” is the tag line for this job search site. A very simple first page – Search Jobs, Post or Edit your Resume, and Find a Recruiter. Click on Search Jobs for their very interesting search engine. They provide examples of how you can leverage their job search engine by leveraging keywords. Click Find a Recruiter (at the top of the screen if you are not on the main page). The page lists a few featured recruiters with a search engine on the right hand side. Enter your criteria and the search engine will return a list of recruiters.
      • The Riley Guide – Probably the most comprehensive job search resource on the Internet, this site has everything you will need. Where to start? The top of the page has a few menu items which link to job search resources . The body of the page has additional resources and related and links to relevant content. The right side of the page has Job Search listings search box. This site is definitely worth spending time on and reviewing all of the resources available.

And if That’s Not Enough:

We are always eager to hear from our readers. Please feel free to contact us if you have any questions or suggestions regarding CareerAlley content.

Good luck in your search,
Joey

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6 Job Search Resources to Focus Your Job Hunt – Salaries

salaryGetting the basic requirements for your job search in place can be overwhelming. Writing your resume, cover letters, working your network, creating your job search plan, company research. Need I go on? But having all of your resources in place with the best resume and the most amazing job experience will not help if you are not focused in your search. There are so many distractions – too many leads (most of which are useless), too much information  – none of this is a good thing.  Of course, you should start off with a job search plan (see Planning for Your Job Search – Lesson 1 and the following lessons to get started on your plan).

So how much are you worth? If you’re lucky, more that you are being paid now. Whatever that number is, you should have a reasonable idea of the job market and how much you can command for compensation (within a range).  Please keep in mind that there are many factors that determine your “worth”.

  • Education – This, of course, depends on your career. A teacher with a Masters degree has more salary potential than a teacher with just a Bachelor’s degree. The educational expectations/requirements in your field could impact your salary – keep this in mind.
  • Experience -How long you’ve worked, who you’ve worked for and what you specifically did will all have an impact on your salary negotiations.
  • Your Current Job Title -What you do is important, but so is your job title. If you are a sales associate, it will be difficult to make that jump to a VP of sales and the associated salary. However, if you are already a Sales Manager, it may not be as difficult. While everyone want so to move up the “ladder of success”, you should be realistic about your current title and you aspirations.
  • Size of Your Current/Last Company – Yes, size does sometimes matter. If you are working with a large organization, then you may be earning more than the same position in a smaller organization. Likewise, you may be able to ask for more compensation if you work in a large organization.
  • Location – Cost of living is a big factor in compensation. Those working in a major city will likely earn more because of they are in a “more expense” part of the country.
  • Certifications and Licenses – The more certifications and licenses you have, the better the chances that you will earn more.  There is a delicate balance between “over qualified” and well qualified (don’t let your qualifications get too far ahead of your career path).

Some salary resources:

Book CornerNegotiating Your Salary: How To Make $1000 a Minute

Last, but not least, how you negotiate will determine how successful you are (or aren’t) in getting your dream salary.  That being said, keep in mind that there are other benefits that can be sometimes negotiated and could have a positive impact on your total “worth”.  These include, but are not limited to: additional paid vacation, overtime rates, employer paid benefit plans, tuition reimbursement and work/life balance to name a few.
We are always eager to hear from our readers. Please feel free to contact us if you have any questions or suggestions regarding CareerAlley content.

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Joey

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Job Search – There Must be an App for That – Part 5 of 5

photo credit: DaveLawler via photopin cc

photo credit: DaveLawler via photopin cc

We’ve all heard the social networking disasters (like people who post questionable pictures or boast of their drug and/or drinking exploits on social network sites thinking only their friends will see them). In 2006, ExecuNet (Growing Number Of Job Searches Disrupted By Digital Dirt) reported that 77% of recruiters surveyed use search tools to learn more about candidates. In 2014, there are stories that employers are asking potential job candidates for login and password information for their social network sites (Will employers still ask for Facebook passwords in 2014?). Times have changed. But, that does not mean you should refrain from using social networks for your job search (although you do need to be careful what you post). Mention social networks and most people immediately think of Facebook. And, notwithstanding the fact that Facebook is by far the largest social network, it is really not a job search tool (sorry Mark Zuckerberg!).

But to understand the real value of business social networks, you really need to understand the basis for their existence. Essentially, they are a glorified address book of your business connections. They allow you to leverage your connections by staying connected with those that can help the most in your career (as well as those you can help the most). Up to date information on people you know, companies, recruiters, advice and targeted business groups – what could be better?

Social media has become a necessity for businesses, and this will cause a merging of individual and business interaction on the most popular sites. My prediction is that Social networks will increasingly become meeting places for businesses looking for new talent and talent looking for jobs.

So lets focus on the tools that can help you leverage your business social networks (and the related smartphone apps) that you can use to, gain more contacts as well as promote your career and job search.

  • Evernote – Evernote can be accessed via a web interface (laptop, desktop, tablet or smartphone) as well as via a (free) Evernote app (iOS / Android). There are also (free) desktop versions for OSX and Windows (the link should detect your operating system). Big picture, Evernote is a repository for just about every digital piece of information in your life (take a look at Evernote Overview). Where Evernote adds value for business social networks is its ability to scan and read business cards.  You can easily add your contacts and then have them at your fingertips via Evernote’s smart search feature (don’t forget to add tags).  There is a free version (can only see your stuff while connected to the Internet) and a premium version (can see all of your stuff at any time).
  • Plaxo -Free for iPhone (with a sync app for Android), this app helps you keep track of your contacts leveraging your Plaxo web based contact list. Share contacts, create groups and easily communicate with your network. Not as robust as LinkedIn, but certainly a help with organizing your contacts and keeping them in sync across your devices.
  • ScanBizCards – This is one of my favorite apps. It can scan almost any business card using the camera on your smartphone, creating a new contact (if needed) or simply keeping a copy in the app. You know how it is, you meet a bunch of people, get their business cards and never get around to entering the data in your contacts. This app will make that task easier (and fun). iPhone and Android versions are available.
  • Smartr Contact – This is a free app that is available on the iPhone and Android and helps organize your contacts in a way you’ve never seen before. It automatically identifies everyone you know from your email, LinkedIn, Facebook, Calendar and more. This is extremely helpful during a job search when it is sometimes impossible to keep track of recruiters, people you’ve interviewed with and your network.
  • LinkedIn – It never ceases to amaze me how many people know about LinkedIn but don’t use it. If you use LinkedIn, you know it is not just about job search. It’s about your working relationships, furthering your career and leveraging your network. However, when you are looking for a new opportunity, it is hard to beat LinkedIn’s value. LinkedIn has apps both for iOS and for Android. While they don’t have the full functionality of the web based version, they will help you stay connected while on the go.

Book Corner – Learn how to leverage your business social networks.

 

 

 

We are always eager to hear from our readers. Please feel free to contact us if you have any questions or suggestions regarding CareerAlley content.

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Joey

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Job Search – There Must be an App for That – Part 4 of 5

Phone“Whether you think you can or whether you think you can’t, you’re right!” – Henry Ford

Life in the Cloud is quickly changing. What once was a handful of spotty cloud services has now turned into a very crowded field of well known players hoping to get your business (see Job Search – There Must be an App for That – Part 1 of 5). A year ago, it was somewhat challenging to grab files and email them via your smartphone. This has all changed. Also, with the introduction of FaceTime on iOS devices, it is now technically possible to have a video interview via your iPhone or iPad while you are “on the road” (although you will need WiFi to do this). I am willing to bet that a few short years from now the ability to video conference via your smartphone will be standard. Okay, getting a bit ahead of myself here. What your smartphone does not easily do is allow you to attach your resume to an email and send it (more on this in a minute). Some of the apps covered in earlier parts of this series in part or in combination provides some of this functionality. Following are a few apps which will help with the communications piece of your job search.

  • PDF Mark-up – So imagine you finally get a job offer which is emailed to in pdf format. You’ve been asked to review the offer and get back to your recruiter by the end of the day. Of course you are away from a computer and it is 3pm on a Friday. What do you do? Adobe Reader for mobile (iPhone/iPad and Android) is a free app that will allow you to mark up a PDF document, freehand draw on it, add a signature, fill out pdf forms and send it via email.
  • Send a Fax – A what? Yes, faxes are old technology but many people and small businesses are still using faxes as a means of sharing documents. There are several apps available (see below) that can send and receive faxes. The app is generally free, but the service is generally not free (although you can usually get a free trial period to try it out). A few alternatives are listed below.
    • iFax – iPhone/iPad and Android, the app is free but you must have an iFax account (paid) to send and receive.
    • eFax – Android and iPhone/iPad, this app is also free but you must have the eFax paid service to send and receive faxes.
  • Scanning – Sometimes you have a hard copy of a document and you need to send it to someone. There are some apps (typically paid apps) that will allow you to turn your smartphone into a document scanner. This is handy if you’ve just signed your multi-million dollar contract and want to send it in.
    • Scan To PDFiPhone/iPad. This is a paid app (currently $2.00 on Android and $4.99 on iOS). It allows you to use your camera or image library and convert them to pdf files.
    • Handy Scanner – This app is currently free on Android
    • CamScanner - This app is currently free for iOS devices

Book Corner: Get the Job: Optimize Your Resume for the Online Job Search

We are always eager to hear from our readers. Please feel free to contact us if you have any questions or suggestions regarding CareerAlley content.

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Joey

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Top 5 Advantages of a Sales Career

success1Many people gaff at the idea of searching through sales job openings with the mindset that there is no growth or real money in sales. Thankfully, you can find sales jobs that offer a little bit of everything from great benefits to nearly unlimited growth potential.

The following are 5 advantages to a career in sales.

1.    Unlimited Opportunity

If you snag a job that is commission based, you have near limitless potential. Not only can you make a lot of money in sales, but you can move up in your industry quickly as a result. Some people have a certain innate ability to sell anything to anyone. If you’re this type of person, you can make vast amounts of money while becoming an invaluable asset to your business.

If you have a passion to continually progress, sales has an opening.

2.    You’ll Face New Challenges

Doing the same thing every day is mundane and tedious. Sales allows you to face new challenges from one week to the next. You may be targeting bigger clients or trying to determine how your product can fit in an industry that has just sprouted up.

As a sales person, you are going to face and tackle new challenges throughout your career.

3.    Job Security

Most jobs are hard to come by. Sales provides a very high level of job security. Not only can you find a new job quickly, but companies are reluctant to fire any sales person who is able to seal the deal with clients. As you advance in your career and really build up your sales prowess, you’ll be an employee that companies will never want to let go.

Does this mean you should never look for a better paying, more lucrative job? No. You need to be selling products that are relevant and mean something. Sales job openings can be found on Jobtonic.com.

4.    Satisfaction

Being a vital cog in a company allows you to feel a high level of satisfaction throughout your career. When you’re making sales and helping the company boost its bottom line, you’ll be able to look back on your accomplishments with pride.

If you’re stuck behind a desk trying to get through an endless list of software bugs, life becomes very boring and dissatisfying.

In sales, you will close deals often, gain praise and earn a lot of money in the process.

5.    Sales is Fun

Ask your friends and family if their job is fun. Most people loathe the idea of going to work each day. With sales, the atmosphere is always different. You will find that sales can be very fun, and you will never have a day where you’re sitting in the office with nothing to do. After all, sales can always be made.

Those that progress in this career will be able to make their own schedules, travel and meet deadlines that are almost impossible in other fields.

Sales is definitely a challenge, but it’s a challenge that is fun and ever changing.

 

We are always eager to hear from our readers. Please feel free to contact us if you have any questions or suggestions regarding CareerAlley content.

Good luck in your search,
Joey

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