Recruiters and Headhunters Revisited Vol I

Recruiters and Headhunters

Just like you get recruited by recruiters, you need to “recruit” them as well and have them work for you. This article is the first in the series for helping find Recruiters/Headhunters.  So what can I say about headhunters? According to Wikipedia, a headhunter is – “A recruiter is someone engaging in recruitment, which is the solicitation of individuals to fill jobs or positions within any group, such as a corporation or sports team.” Make them part of your team, give them everything they need to help market you and find a job for you.

Executive Recruiters are typically recruiters that specialize in high-end job searches usually by retainer (paid up front for the job search, rather than after the individual is hired).  Headhunters or recruiters tend to work off of commission once they’ve successfully filled a job.  Keep in mind that recruiters work for the hiring company (and get paid by them).  While they will help you get a job, their first priority is to ensure that their client is happy with the results.

Following is a short list of some well known recruiters.

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I Lost my Job, Now What?

Fired

Unfortunately, many people have lost their jobs over the past few years.  Companies go out of business, “reorganize”, merge or have job reductions to improve the bottom line. While every industry is different, all industries have felt the pain and there is a knock-on impact on other businesses caused by job loss. Many people find themselves out of work and the difficulty of finding a new job is challenging to say the least.

Losing your job is incredibly stressful.  Our job partly defines who we are and the means by which we live. The stages of emotional change caused by job loss are very similar to the stages of grief when losing a loved one:

  1. Denial and Shock
  2. Anger
  3. Bargaining
  4. Guilt
  5. Depression
  6. Resolution and reorganization

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5 Things Not to Say At A Job Interview

Bad Interviews

You get a call from the HR department and learn you’ve finally landed the big interview. You’re well prepared. You’ve done online reputation repair and scrubbed YouTube of any embarrassing videos there might be of you. You’ve put together a portfolio of your best projects, and you’ve used your final dwindling funds on buying a nice suit. You’ve printed up resumes and sheathed them in protective covers, you’ve shaved, showered, prayed, and now, you’re ready. Months and months of unemployment could be about to come to an end. Now don’t ruin it by saying something stupid at your interview! Here are five things NOT to say to a potential employer:

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Skilled Workers – Where are they

Skilled Workers Infographic | American Trainco
Presented by Americantrainco.com

We are always eager to hear from our readers. Please feel free to contact us if you have any questions or suggestions regarding CareerAlley content.

Good luck in your search,
Joey

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5 Ways to Ensure Your Thank You Letter is Noticed

UnknownYou’ve  gone on the big interview and you are ready for the next step, but have you sent your thank you letter? Some people think that thank you letters (or emails these days) are a thing of the past, but that is not the case. Your thank you letter is a key part of the job search process, so don’t ignore it. While you may have said everything you wanted to during the interview, your thank you letter is your chance to communicate:

  • That you heard everything the interviewer(s) said;
  • That you are the right person for the job;
  • That you are interested in the company and the position.

While your thank you letter should not be too long, you should include the items listed below.  Also, if you interviewed with more than one person, make sure that your thank you letters are personalized to the interviewer (and are not form letters).

1. Why Your Experience is a Perfect Match for the Job:

This is your opportunity to ensure that the hiring manager knows that you have the right experience for the job. Mention specific issues raised during the interview and explain (with examples) how you can help to address their needs. You want to express two items here: that you heard and understand the challenges of the job and that you have the experience to help them solve their issues/problems.

 

2. What Have You Achieved in Your Current (and past) Roles?

Hiring managers not only want to hear that you understand their problems, they want specific examples of what you’ve achieved. Provide concrete examples of success you’ve had in previous roles. These accomplishments should be things that were above and beyond expectations.  Be as specific as you can, such as “increased sales 10%” or “successfully launched a new product”. Whatever your achievements, now is not the time to be shy.

 

3. Clarify Open Items or Items Not Discussed:

Interviews don’t always go as planned and sometimes you don’t get the opportunity to discuss topics you feel are pertinent to the roll. Your thank you letter is the time to provide additional information or perhaps to clarify part of the discussion that was not entirely clear. If there was some confusion about your experience or resume, now is the time to set things straight.

 

4. A Thank You Letter is Not a Novel:

You want to ensure your thank you letter includes key points, but it should not be a very long letter. There is a delicate balance between including the right information and not making it too long. One page is more than enough. Assuming you get additional interviews, you can provide additional information then. Make sure your letter is organized in a way that flows naturally. Don’t ramble on and don’t write a bunch of bullet points.

 

5. Personalize and Follow-up:

You should write a thank you letter for each person that interviewed you. Each letter should be personalized so that the individual knows it was written specifically for them. Now is also the time to indicate that you will follow-up in a week or two.  This shows the interviewer(s) that you are interested in the position and that you can take initiative.

Thank you letters should have structure (take a look at some formats on the Internet) and should be timely. Sending your thank you letter via email is fine and you should not wait more than a day or so to send it. You want to leverage your letter so that you stand out from the crowd and a timely letter can help you do just that.

Book Corner:

 

 

 

 

We are always eager to hear from our readers. Please feel free to contact us if you have any questions or suggestions regarding CareerAlley content.

Good luck in your search,
Joey

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Joey@careeralley.com
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what where
job title, keywords or company
city, state or zip jobs by job search

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